Princess Feather

9845 N. Hardin Rd. Piqua, Ohio

Located at the Johnston Farm and Indian Agency

Located at Johnston Farm and Indian Agency. Take St. Rt. 66 northwest from Piqua about 3.5 miles to Hardin Rd.  Visitors will need to pay the admission fee in order to view this barn.  Very highly recommended as a tourist attraction.

The quilt pattern Princess Feather adorns a mammoth double-penned log barn, constructed in 1808 on the property now known as Johnston Farm.  The pattern itself was on a quilt that was originally found in the historic Johnston home.  The barn is reputed to be the oldest and largest of its type in Ohio, and is still in use on the grounds.  Nearby a ring-shaped mound earthwork was constructed by people of the Adena culture over 2,000 years ago.  This mound was discovered and preserved by Colonel John Johnston, the original owner of the property.  Colonel Johnston was a farmer, public official, and U.S. Indian Agent for western Ohio from 1812 to 1829, and also the Miami-Erie Canal Commissioner.  Here Johnston’s numerous contributions to the growth of early Ohio and settlement of frontier America are presented in a truly unique and beautiful setting.

Johnston Farm and Indian Agency covers 2,000 years of Ohio history – from prehistoric Indians to Ohio’s canal era.  John Johnston’s farm is the focal point of the property.  Today, visitors enjoy the home and 250 acre farm of this most extraordinary man much as it appeared in 1829. Preserved and furnished structures include Johnston’s two-story mixed Dutch Colonial/Georgian style farmhouse, a unique two-story spring house, a cider house and the double-penned log barn.  Costumed interpreters and craft demonstrators provide farm tours and display activities in the summer kitchen and fruit kiln areas.
The museum, constructed to resemble the blockhouse style of Fort Piqua, General Anthony Wayne’s 18th century supply post, traces the story of the Eastern Woodland Indians of Ohio and the newly acquired Fort Pickawillany site, located adjacent to the Piqua Historical Area. Artifacts from Ohio’s canal era are also on exhibit.
Behind the museum is a restored, mile-long section of the Miami-Erie Canal, which once extended from Toledo to Cincinnati. As a state canal commissioner, Johnston helped to improve Ohio’s canal system. Today, the mule-drawn, 70-foot mixed cargo, canal boat, the General Harrison, can be ridden as costumed guides relate the history of the canals.

For information and open hours of the farm –www.johnstonfarmohio.com

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